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{Foster Parenting} Bedtime Routine.

Creating a bedtime routine is important for both the child and the parent. When little momma first moved to our house, we found that over the course of her moves her bedtime routine had changed dramatically. As a result, she occasionally fights sleep and has struggled to stay asleep during the night. We have found that by creating a strong bedtime routine, we are able to minimize her nighttime anxiety and help her feel more rested.

Here’s our routine:

8:00 PM– Shower/Bath. She’s at the age where showering is appropriate for hair washing days, but she still enjoys bath time.

8:20 PM– Teeth/Hair/Fish. After bathtime she brushes her teeth, hair, and feeds her fish independently.

8:30 PM– Points. We review the day and give points for positive behaviors.

8:35 PM– Quiet time/Catch up. There are days when we are distracted or life gets in the way and need a few extra minutes to get back on track. We use this time as a buffer. If the day goes smoothly, we use this time for reading or coloring in bed. This helps calm the mind and encourages a SLOW down!

8:50 PM– Devotion/Prayer. I do a quick devotion with little mama every night. On days I forget, she usually tells my mom on me. She prays after devotion.

9:00 PM– Lights Out. Bedtime.

Bedtime is hard for us for a variety of reasons. Little momma responds to cues, but often has a lot of bottled up energy and doesn’t like going to bed. She also struggles with staying asleep and feeling grumpy in the morning. We’ve found the below tips to be extremely helpful in creating a better bedtime routine.

– No screens an hour before we begin the bedtime routine. Screens overstimulate children and it’s hard for them to shut down after screen time.

– No chocolate milk or juice with dinner. This has been the hardest for us to cut out. At first we thought, “hey, milk is milk,” but then quickly realized the sugars ramped her up and made it harder to sleep.

– Reminding her that a 9 PM bedtime is appropriate for her age and her growing body. Again, at first, she wanted to stay up and watch a show with us because we were awake. We had to tell her that her body required more sleep and that most of her friends went to sleep at the same time. This helps her remember that she’s going to bed for her best interest.

Tell me: Does your child struggle with bedtime? What methods have you found helpful?

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